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Chamisa Warms Up To Dialogue; Invites SA, SADC To Mediate

Opposition leader Nelson Chamisa has invited the regional bloc, SADC and the South African government to intervene and mediate in Zimbabwe’s political and economic crisis, which continues to deteriorate daily.

In his latest tweet, Chamisa called on SADC to help with the mediation process in order to have a dialogue which is to the benefit of the nation.

His comments follow a speech made by South Africa’s Minister of International Relations Naledi Pandor during a symposium on the “Best Path towards a Prosperous Zimbabwe” where she called on Zimbabwean leaders to amicably address their issues together.

She said that before other countries intervened, all parties in the country must agree to those interventions.

“We regard it as part of our modest contribution to beginning a process of articulating solutions to the many complex challenges, which we believe will be resolved primarily by the people of Zimbabwe, with the assistance of all countries. There’s no sense of arrogance that we have the solution, like South Africa,” the South African Diplomat said Monday.

Chamisa has for a long time refused to come to the a round table with President Emmerson Mnangagwa as he has stuck to his stunt that the latter is an illegitimate leader since last year’s elections.

However, in recent times, the young politician seems to have started embracing the idea of a dialogue with the party seemingly dropping the legitimacy issue, which he had set as a prerequisite for dialogue.

He said the dialogue will sort to address “man-made governance crisis in Zimbabwe and help us restore the dignity of citizens.”

Chamisa stated that the intervention will give the nation hope by ending the suffering of the Zimbabwean people.

“In the face of provocation and persecution, our commitment to a sustainable, peaceful outcome has not shirked,” he said.

He further called on the South African government to assist with aid, especially in the health sector as the long standoff between the Zimbabwean government and doctors continues unresolved.

“I wish to plead with SA, in the interim, to help set up a donor fund for our people from which we can pay our doctors a decent wage. There is a silent genocide in hospitals which cannot wait for politicians to find each other,” he said.

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