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Diasporans Donate To Mudzi Landmine Victims

Zimbabweans living in the diaspora, through Starlight Global have donated more than US$ 2000 towards a goat projects set to change the fortunes of a number of landmine victims living in Mudzi District.

The money that was donated towards the goat project amounted to US$ 2479 and 210 pounds in cash.  The beneficiaries went on to donate wheelchairs and clothes for the victims as well.

Starlight Global, a not-for-profit organization based in the United Kingdom noted that Zimbabwe is on the map globally for having the largest landmine density, thus putting communities around those infested areas in chaos.

Starlight Global Director, Shanice Lindsay said the donation will make a difference to the people of Mudzi.

“We do not have millions but we are sure the small donation that we have contributed will make a difference to the people in Mudzi,” said Lindsay.

Member of Parliament for Mudzi, Newten Kachepa said landmines in his area remained a threat to women and children.

“The government together with partners have since started the process of removing landmines but the process is slow as the landmines are in the communities where women and children move around. Various people have been hit by these landmines and as a result, many die and some lose limbs. The situation is disheartening so we thank the diasporans for remembering us,” said Kachepa.

One of the chiefs from the landmine infested areas, Chief Boyi Nyamande Goronga said the donation towards the goat project would help them to boost their goat breed and improve household incomes.

“It is a pleasure that the landmine victims are going to benefit from the goat project that the diasporans have helped us initiate. We are grateful for the support,” said Goronga.

About 87 communities from the five wards of Mudzi are still infested with landmines.

In an interview with 263Chat, David Jairos, one of the victims who attended the handover ceremony said a landmine blew his leg while he was herding cattle in 2002.

“The landmines also killed four of my cattle apart from crippling me. I now depend on others since I’m now left with one leg. The project that the diasporans have initiated for us will help us in our livelihood. I am grateful that they have shown compassion for us,” Jairos said.

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