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Is Manhounds a game changer in our local film industry?

Manhounds a local television series produced by Invision Studios (IS) is set to air after talks with interested potential distributors have been finalized.

 By Marshall Bwanya

The much anticipated seven episode TV series that has been receiving positive reviews following its pilot screening on Thursday in Harare, promising to be a must to watch game changer, we need to raise the bar for our local film industry.

With good visuals, characters, script and a thrilling plot the series is projected to draw favourable viewership.

Manhounds producer and script writer Charles Mugava confirmed that IS was engaged in advanced negotiations with an undisclosed potential distributor whose details they were not yet at liberty to disclose at the current moment.

“Concerning the official release date for Manhounds, we are currently having talks with an interested distributor, but not at liberty to disclose much at the moment.

“Our aim though is to have as many people watch the first season and then secure funding for second season to be produced,” he said.

Manhounds’ plot is centered on four childhood friends whose friendship, trust and bond is put to the test after a sudden fateful twist of events.

The four friends ‘perfect’ lives’ suddenly starts falling apart when one of them Tawanda, unexpectedly returns to Harare from Johannesburg fleeing from Rufus a human traffic crime boss he owes.

 

Tawanda’s luck runs out when Cobra, Rufus brother trails him in Zimbabwe and demand that $US 50 000 for Tawanda’s unpaid dues.

In a bid to pay out the hefty amount while playing a game of cat mouse Tawanda drags his other three friends, Kumbi, Tamuka and Jason into the dark world of human trafficking, extortion and crime at the mercy of ruthless Cobra.

Mugaya said he was inspired to write about human trafficking because it is a sensitive issue that is being downplayed in the country also in view of the current migration trends of Zimbabweans were citizens are seeking greener pastures in bordering countries with or without proper documentation.

“The inspiration for this story came from seeing how underwhelming the coverage for the topic is locally.

“It is also a topic that could be more relevant in Zimbabwe more than we would like to think. Our aim is to not just make content for passive entertainment, but content with depth that addresses real issues, he said.

Zimbabweans migrating to bordering South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Mozambique without proper documentation are exposed to heinous acts forced labour, including domestic servitude, and sex trafficking.

Mugaya reiterated that he penned down Manhounds with the intention of creating a story that was both enticing and entertaining to all audiences.

Where viewers that watch Manhounds are educated and conscientised about the horrors of human trafficking despite their background.

What is also interesting and perhaps peculiar about Manhounds is way the plot thickens resonating with the nature of our current moral fabric, societal expectations and aspirations at the same time exposing the ills of human trafficking and crime.

Manhounds casts consists new faces in the local film scene such as Joshua Warren who plays Cobra,  Ian Swanepoel as Tawanda, Tanaka Chiriga acting as Tamuka, Nyasha Nhongo as Kumbi, Taurai Bayisayi as Jason, and a host of other cast members.

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